intothecontinuum:


Mathematica code:
G[A_, B_, s_, N_, T_, t_, pr_, th_] := Graphics[  {EdgeForm[{AbsoluteThickness[th], Black}], FaceForm[White],    Polygon[    Table[     {{0, 0},      {(Cos[4a+s*t]+Sin[4a+s*t])Cos[a+s*t], (Cos[4a+s*t]+Sin[4a+s*t]) Sin[a+s*t]},      {(Cos[4a+s+s*t]+Sin[4a+s+s*t])Cos[a+s+s*t], (Cos[4a+s+s*t]+Sin[4a+s+s*t]) Sin[a+s+s*t]}},     {a, B + T, A + T, 2 Pi/N}]]},   PlotRange -> pr, ImageSize -> 500]Manipulate[G[2Pi, 0, .75, 200, T, 0, 1.5, .3],{T,0,2PI}] 



Because math.

intothecontinuum:

Mathematica code:


G[A_, B_, s_, N_, T_, t_, pr_, th_] :=
Graphics[
{EdgeForm[{AbsoluteThickness[th], Black}], FaceForm[White],
Polygon[
Table[
{{0, 0},
{(Cos[4a+s*t]+Sin[4a+s*t])Cos[a+s*t], (Cos[4a+s*t]+Sin[4a+s*t]) Sin[a+s*t]},
{(Cos[4a+s+s*t]+Sin[4a+s+s*t])Cos[a+s+s*t], (Cos[4a+s+s*t]+Sin[4a+s+s*t]) Sin[a+s+s*t]}},
{a, B + T, A + T, 2 Pi/N}]]},
PlotRange -> pr, ImageSize -> 500]

Manipulate[
G[2Pi, 0, .75, 200, T, 0, 1.5, .3],
{T,0,2PI}]

Because math.

(via bandanagirl)

sciencesoup:

A Moving Perspective
Stop for a moment, and let me tell you the story of you. You were born in the heart of a star, in a brilliant white furnace that churned and trembled and dazzled the darkness. Every atom in your body was cooked in a stellar crucible as dense as fifty elephants crammed inside a thimble, and then, as its world raged and shook, the star tore open its own heart for you, exploding suicidal atoms far across the oceans of the universe—atoms that came to reside in you. The remnants of such a dead star—a vast cloud of stellar gas and dust—acted as a nursery for our solar system too, forming the sun and the planets swirling around it over billions of years. You’re just clinging to the crust of this rocky world, encased in the blue skin of its atmosphere. You’re fresh on the crest of of tens of thousands of generations, and you’re moving faster than you could ever imagine. The earth beneath your feet is spinning at 1,600 km/h, the planet is hurtling around the sun at 107,500 km/h, the sun is moving towards Vega at 70,000 km/h, the Orion arm of our spiral galaxy is rotating at 900,000 km/h, and the Milky Way is heading for the Andromeda galaxy at 3,600,000 km/h…. And still here you are—a lovely collection of atoms, a perfect composition of organic molecules, a child of the stars themselves. You are the universe, every speck of you, and in a hundred billion galaxies, there is not another like you. 

sciencesoup:

A Moving Perspective

Stop for a moment, and let me tell you the story of you. You were born in the heart of a star, in a brilliant white furnace that churned and trembled and dazzled the darkness. Every atom in your body was cooked in a stellar crucible as dense as fifty elephants crammed inside a thimble, and then, as its world raged and shook, the star tore open its own heart for you, exploding suicidal atoms far across the oceans of the universe—atoms that came to reside in you. The remnants of such a dead star—a vast cloud of stellar gas and dust—acted as a nursery for our solar system too, forming the sun and the planets swirling around it over billions of years. You’re just clinging to the crust of this rocky world, encased in the blue skin of its atmosphere. You’re fresh on the crest of of tens of thousands of generations, and you’re moving faster than you could ever imagine. The earth beneath your feet is spinning at 1,600 km/h, the planet is hurtling around the sun at 107,500 km/h, the sun is moving towards Vega at 70,000 km/h, the Orion arm of our spiral galaxy is rotating at 900,000 km/h, and the Milky Way is heading for the Andromeda galaxy at 3,600,000 km/h…. And still here you are—a lovely collection of atoms, a perfect composition of organic molecules, a child of the stars themselves. You are the universe, every speck of you, and in a hundred billion galaxies, there is not another like you. 

wired:

wnycradiolab:

staceythinx:

These fantastic Stellar Science Wonder prints from the Ink and Sword Etsy store are available separately or in a shiny metal collector’s box set.

About the project:

Ink and Sword’s Stellar Science series aims to inspire new interest in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math, known as the STEM subjects. These retro-styled inspirational prints reflect back to an era where a trip to the moon was not just the pinnacle of scientific achievement, it was the coolest thing in the universe to be an astronaut, explorer or scientist. Sparked with our preference to play in science halls and planetariums, chemistry labs and in nature, we hope that condition of wonder and imagination continues on for the future!

How could we possibly resist reblogging this?  We could not.

Perfect for decorating your locker, cubicle, breakfast nook… pretty much any surface, basically.

I desperately love these.

its so beautiful gif